Society for Anglo-Chinese Understanding – SACU News

Picking tomatoes

Picking tomatoes

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Society for Anglo-Chinese Understanding – SACU News

The Society for Anglo-Chinese Understanding is a friendship association of people in Britain toward China. It was founded on May 15, 1965, and in its early years it was sympathetic to the Chinese Revolution and socialism. Its early leaders included Dr. Joseph Needham and Professor Joan Robinson (who were both also involved, at the same time, with the China Policy Study Group).

The abrupt ending of the SACU News monthly magazine coincides with the start of the publication of China Now – copies of which we have not be able to access.

As SACU followed a very much ‘pro-China’ line during the course of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution the wishy-washy liberals, who had joined in the early years, drifted away only to return to take control of the organisation when the Chinese ‘capitalist-roaders’ took the country away from the construction of Socialism and towards the full scale restoration of capitalism.

The organisation still exists but seems to function more as a mouthpiece of the Chinese government in Britain and providing its members with official visits to capitalist China.

In the 1970s SACU was criticised for publicising the revolutionary, Socialist, developments of the People’s Republic of China when the country was attempting to improve the conditions for the vast majority of the population. Now it praises the erstwhile Socialist country for its capitalist (and imperialist) development.

SACU News – Monthly Publication

1965

Vol. 1, No. 1 – October 1965, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 2 – November 1965, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 3 – December 1965, 4 pages

1966

Vol. 1, No. 4 – January 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 5 – February 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 6 – March 1966

Vol. 1, No. 7 – April 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 8 – May 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 9 – June-July 1966, 8 pages

Vol. 1, No. 10 – August 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 11 – September 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 12 – October 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 13 – November 1966, 4 pages

Vol. 1, No. 14 – December 1966, 4 pages

1967

Vol. 2, No. 1 – January 1967, 4 pages

Vol. 2, No. 2 – February 1967, 4 pages

Vol. 2, No. 3 – March 1967, 4 pages

Vol. 2, No. 4 – April 1967, 4 pages

Vol. 2, No. 5 – May 1967, 4 pages

Vol. 2, No. 6 – June 1967, 8 pages

Vol. 2, No. 7/8 – July-August 1967, 8 pages

Vol. 2, No. 9-10 – September-October 1967, 8 pages

Vol. 2, No. 11 – November 1967, 8 pages

Vol. 2, No. 12 – December 1967, 8 pages

1968

Vol. 3, No. 1 – January 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 2 – February 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 3 – March 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 4 – April 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 5 – May 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 6/7 – June-July 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 8 – August 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 9/10 – September-October 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 11 – November 1968, 8 pages

Vol. 3, No. 12 – December 1968, 8 pages

1969

Vol. 4, No. 1 – January 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 2 – February 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 3 – March 1969

Vol. 4, No. 4/5 – April-May 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 6 – June 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 7 – July 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 8 – August 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 9/10 – September-October 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 11 – November 1969, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 12 – December 1969, 8 pages

1970

Vol. 4, No. 13 – January 1970, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 14 – February 1970, 8 pages

Vol. 4, No. 15 – March 1970 [Last issue], 8 pages

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The renegades, traitors and ‘capitalist-roaders’ within the Communist Party of China

32 years after his death the 'capitalist-roaders' ride on Mao's back

32 years after his death the ‘capitalist-roaders’ ride on Mao’s back – Nanning, September 2008

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The renegades, traitors and ‘capitalist-roaders’ within the Communist Party of China

Opposite the title page of my copy of the odious Trotsky’s so-called ‘biography’ of Comrade Stalin, entitled ‘Stalin – an appraisal of the man and his influence’, is a reproduction of a poster showing the members of the Central Committee of the Bolshevik Party just after the victory of the 1917 October Revolution. Below that is a schematic giving their names – a number of whom I cannot remember hearing about before (and so indicating that they might have been on the CC but they were not necessarily that important in the construction of Socialism in the nascent Soviet Union).

At the bottom of the page is written;

‘Of the thirty-one members and alternate members of the October Central Committee, some of whose portraits appear above, only two were alive in 1946 – Stalin and Alexandra Kollontai.’

Now that’s just under thirty years. I don’t quite understand the point being made by the publisher of this version of Trotsky’s vitriolic attack upon Comrade Stalin.

And there’s no explanation about why they were no longer alive in 1946. For example, VI Lenin died prematurely because he was the victim of an assassination attempt, M Uritsky died of an assassin’s bullet, FE Dzerzhinsky (Iron Felix) died of heart failure after a major speech at a Central Committee meeting where he attacked the ‘United Opposition’ of Trotsky, Zinoviev and Kamanev.

The implication seems to be that there should be no change in the leadership of a Communist Party but the very same people who take an anti-Soviet stance would argue that some leaders of Communist parties stay in their positions of responsibility for longer than is healthy – which does have a certain validity but which is a debate for a different place.

A social revolution, and especially a Socialist Revolution, is a very complex thing. It has been so throughout history, is at present (in those few revolutionary movements still in existence) and will be in the future.

Individuals join a revolutionary movement for a myriad of reasons. Some are/will/might;

  • committed revolutionaries who hate the system of oppression and exploitation and have a perspective of a different future for the vast majority of the population
  • opportunists who think the train they have jumped on is the best for their self-advancement
  • downright spies and traitors planted by the ruling class in their attempt to prevent the inevitable
  • dilettantes who chose to join a revolutionary movement because other organisations don’t offer anything substantial but who don’t fundamentally accept what joining the movement actually means
  • just hangers on, who are ignorant of the consequences of their actions and can swing either way when the going gets tough
  • ideologically weak and crack when the pressure of the ruling class becomes too great
  • betray the movement when put under the slightest pressure
  • empty-headed and never thought of the consequences of what they had signed up to do
  • hate the present oppressive system but don’t realise that the only way to destroy it is to substitute the dictatorship of the bourgeoisie with the dictatorship of the proletariat
  • think a revolution is a game and don’t understand the implications of what Chairman Mao meant when he said ‘a revolution is not a dinner party’
  • a waste a space and a waste of time
  • intellectuals who think they know better and are astounded when the people don’t accept their sophistication and superior leadership
  • start off being honest but end up getting seduced by the power that a little learning provides them, thanks to their involvement in the movement but forgetting their background
  • forget their background (I hate the term ‘roots’, but that’s the general sense) and think they are better than the hoi poloi
  • think they have an innate right to be in positions of leadership and take umbrage when that’s challenged
  • like to criticise but don’t like to be criticised
  • don’t consider that self-criticism is an integral part of being a Marxist-Leninist revolutionary
  • think they don’t need to study to understand the theory of Marxism-Leninism-Maoism and that they will learn from the process of osmosis
  • get tired and take the easy way out which often turns to a counter-revolutionary stance
  • get old and find that the revolution they thought about in their youth is not the revolution through which they are living
  • resent ‘unknowns’, strangers, new entrants and others who haven’t earned their positions taking over positions of responsibility as they represent the general momentum of the revolution
  • can’t keep up with the pace of change
  • challenged by youth who they see as being ignorant
  • try to take the easy way out
  • give up
  • run away
  • have doubts, about themselves and the reason for carrying on
  • courageous
  • cowards
  • lazy
  • liars
  • selfish
  • arrogant

But it’s the Revolution, that inanimate but also living organism, that is always in control.

Anyone who has been part of the Marxist-Leninist movement – in whatever country, in whatever epoch – since the formulation of Marxist theory in the middle of the 19th century will have encountered variations of the above. Indeed they will display some of those traits themselves, often ones that are contradictory.

This doesn’t mean that certain individuals might have been useful, even fundamental, to the revolution in the past but the fact is that a revolution is an uncontrollable force; it crushes some of those who were it’s darlings in the past but who become obstructionist in the present; some get left behind as the revolution has decided to take a different course from that expected; some get bitter about their lack of understanding of the radical changes in the revolutionary process; and those who were once friends of the revolution become its enemies as their own personal interests take precedence over the revolution itself.

The leader of the gang of renegades, traitors and ‘capitalist-roaders’ represented below is, without a shadow of a doubt, Liu Shaoqi (Liu Shao-chi) who showed his true colours in the early days of the People’s Republic. Perhaps one of Comrade Mao‘s greatest failings was not ridding the Party of this revisionist and ‘capitalist-roader’ sooner. It was around him, and under his influence, that the others were able to spread their poisonous line within the Party.

Liu must have had supporters in the highest levels of the Party, probably in the form of Zhou Enlai (Chou En-lai).

Liu Shaoqi [Liu Shao-chi] (1898-1969)

Collections of His Writings

Selected Works of Liu Shaoqi, Volume 1, (Beijing: FLP, 1984), 463 pages.

Selected Works of Liu Shaoqi, Volume 2, (Beijing: FLP, 1991), 1st ed., 487 pages.

Three Essays on Party-Building, by Liu Shaoqi, includes: How to Be a Good Communist (1939), On Inner-Party Struggle (1941), and On the Party (1945). This edition uses Pinyin versions of Chinese names. It may or may not have been altered in other ways from earlier English editions. (Peking: FLP, 1980), 316 pages.

On the Agrarian Reform Law, by Liu Shao-chi. Included in The Agrarian Reform Law of the People’s Republic of China – Together with other relevant documents on pages 75-104. (Peking: FLP, 1950)

How To Be a Good Communist, by Liu Shao-chi. First English edition of the Chinese version published in December 1949. [Note: This is the notorious book on self-cultivation that was strongly criticized during the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution.] (Peking: FLP, 1951), 136 pages.

Internationalism and Nationalism, by Liu Shao-chi. This pamphlet is probably the translation of an article that appeared in Renmin Ribao [People’s Daily] on Nov. 1, 1948, or else is based on that article. (Peking: FLP, n.d. [but probably 1952]), 63 pages.

The Political Report of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China to the Eighth National Congress of the Party, by Liu Shao-chi, September 15, 1956. (Peking: FLP, 1956), 102 pages.

Report on the Work of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China to the Second Session of the Eighth National Congress, by Liu Shao-chi, May 5, 1958, 51 pages. [This speech is taken from pages 16-61 of the 1958 pamphlet Second Session of the Eighth National Congress of the Communist Party of China (Peking: FLP, 1958), 99 pages.] Liu Shao-chi’s speech only, full Pamphlet

Opening Speech by Chairman Liu Shao-chi, at the meeting to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China, Oct. 1, 1959. From the Supplement to Peking Review, Vol. 2, 39, Oct. 1, 1959, 2 pages.

The Victory of Marxism-Leninism in China, by Liu Shao-chi, Sept. 14, 1959. An article written for the World Marxist Review in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. From Peking Review, Vol. 2, 39, Oct. 1, 1959, 10 pages. Pamphlet version (Peking: FLP, 1959), 46 pages.

Address at the Meeting in Celebration of the 40th Anniversary of the Founding of the Communist Party of China, by Liu Shao-chi, June 30, 1961, with two appendices (editorials from Hongqi and Renmin Ribao). (Peking: FLP, 1961), 46 pages. Version from Peking Review, July 7, 1961, 7 pages.

Joint Statement of Chairman Liu Shao-chi and President Choi Yong Kun, on the conclusion of the visit by the President of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to China in June 1963. (Peking: FLP, 1963), 24 pages.

Deng Xiaoping [Teng Hsiao-ping] (1904-1997)

Selected Works of Deng Xiaoping (3 volumes)

Selected Works of Deng Xiaoping (1938-1965) This collection was first published in Chinese in 1989 and in English in 1992. Smaller file, OCR scan, larger file, image scan.

Selected Works of Deng Xiaoping (1975-1982) This collection was first published in Chinese in 1983 and in English in 1984. Smaller file, OCR scan, larger file, image scan.

Selected Works of Deng Xiaoping (1982-1992) This collection was first published in Chinese in 1993 and in English in 1994. Smaller file, OCR scan, larger file, image scan.

Constitution of the Communist Party of China and Report on the Revision of the Constitution of the CPC by Teng Hsiao-ping. This is the Party Constitution adopted by the Eighth National Congress on Sept. 26, 1956. The report of the the revision of the Constitution was delivered by Teng Hsiao-ping [Deng Xiaoping] at that Congress on Sept. 16, 1956. (Peking: FLP, 1956), 118 pp.

Speech by Teng Hsiao-ping, General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party, at the Mass Rally of People of All Walks of Life Held in Peking to Support the Just Stand of the Soviet Union and Oppose U.S. Imperialism’s Wrecking of the Four-Power Conference of Government Heads, May 20, 1960, 6 pages. From the pamphlet Support the Just Stand of the Soviet Union and Oppose U.S. Imperialism’s Wrecking of the Four-Power Conference of Government Heads, (Peking: FLP, 1960), 45 pages. Deng’s speech, full pamphlet

Speech by Chairman of the Delegation of the People’s Republic of China, Teng Hsiao-ping, at the Special Session of the U.N. General Assembly, April 10, 1974. (Peking: FLP, 1974), 28 pages.

Build Socialism with Chinese Characteristics, a collection of speeches and essays from 1982 to 1984. 1st edition, (Beijing: FLP, 1985), 88 pages.

Chen Yun (1905-1995)

Selected Works of Chen Yun, Volume 1: 1926-1949, 2nd ed., (Beijing: FLP, 2001), 419 pages.

Selected Works of Chen Yun, Volume 2: 1949-1956, 1st ed., (Beijing: FLP, 1997), 359 pages.

Selected Works of Chen Yun, Volume 3: 1956-1994, 1st ed., (Beijing: FLP, 1999), 409 pages.

Vice-Premier Chen Yun’s Speech at the Reception Given by Bulgarian Ambassador Celebrating the National Day of the People’s Republic of Bulgaria (Excerpts), September 9, 1958. Included in the pamphlet Oppose U.S. Military Provocations in the Taiwan Straits Area – A Selection of Important Documents, (Peking: FLP, 1958), 83 pages. (See pages 9-13.)

Lin Biao [Lin Piao] (1907-1971)

Collections of his writings:

Selected Works of Lin Piao, ed. by the China Problems Research Center, (Hong Kong: 1970), 496 pages. This volume was prepared at a time when Lin Biao was Mao’s designated successor and before his disgrace and death in late 1971.

Speeches and Instructions of Lin Piao, 1966-1967, some translated by Western scholars, special issue of the academic journal Chinese Law and Government, Spring 1973, 108 pages.

Speeches and Instructions of Lin Piao, 1968-1971, some translated by Western scholars, special issue of the academic journal Chinese Law and Government, Summer 1973, 108 pages.

March Ahead Under the Red Flag of the General Line and Mao Tse-tung’s Military Thinking, by Lin Piao, originally in Hongqi, 19 (Oct. 1, 1959); in English translation in Peking Review, Vol. 2, 40, October 6, 1959, 8 pages, and in pamphlet form, (Peking: FLP, 1959), 34 pages.

Long Live the Victory of People’s War!, by Lin Piao [Lin Biao], Sept. 3, 1965. This famous essay was written in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of victory in the Chinese People’s War of Resistance Against Japan. It is often still viewed as an important statement of the role of people’s war in the world despite Lin’s own personal treachery later on. (Peking: FLP, 3rd ed., 1967), 76 pages.

Chairman Mao Has Elevated Marxism-Leninism to a Completely New Stage With Great Talent, letter from Lin Piao, March 11, 1966, 1 pages. [Also available in Peking Review, vol. 9, 26, June 24, 1966.]

Comrade Lin Piao’s Speech at the Mass Rally Celebrating the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, August 18, 1966, 3 pages. [Also available in Peking Review, vol. 9, 35, August 26, 1966.]

Comrade Lin Piao’s Speech at the Peking Rally to Receive Revolutionary Teachers and Students from All Parts of China, Aug. 31, 1966, 3 pages. [Also available in Peking Review, vol. 9, 37, September 9, 1966.]

The People’s Revolutionary Struggle Will Surely Triumph Over U.S. Imperialism’s Counter-Revolutionary Strategy – In commemoration of the first anniversary of the publication of Comrade Lin Piao’s essay ‘Long Live the Victory of People’s War!’, by Tung Ming, 3 pages. [Also available in Peking Review, vol. 9, September 9, 1966.]

Comrade Lin Piao’s Speech at the Peking Rally to Receive Revolutionary Teachers and Students from All Parts of China, September 15, 1966, 2 pages. [Also available in Peking Review, vol. 9, September 23, 1966.]

Lin Piao’s Inscription and Introduction to the Second Edition of Quotations From Chairman Mao Tse-tung, December 16, 1966, 4 pages. [After the fall and death of Lin Piao these pages were of course removed from the 3rd edition of the Little Red Book. (The 1st edition had Lin Piao’s inscription but not his introduction.)]

Report to the Ninth National Congress of the Communist Party of China, delivered by Lin Piao on April 1 and adopted on April 14, 1969. (Peking: FLP, 1969), 112 pages.

Vice-Chairman Lin Piao’s Speech at the Rally Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Founding of the People’s Republic of China, October 1, 1969, 10 pages. From the pamphlet Fight for the Further Consolidation of the Dictatorship of the Proletariat – In Celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Founding of the People’s Republic of China. (Peking: FLP, 1969) Lin’s speech only, complete pamphlet, 54 pages.

Works about Lin Biao (Lin Piao): [See also the post on the Campaign to Criticize Lin Piao and Confucius.]

Great Victory for the Military Line of Chairman Mao Tsetung – A Criticism of Lin Piao’s Bourgeois Military Line in the Liaohsi-Shenyang and Peiping-Tientsin Campaigns, by Chan Shih-pu, (Peking: FLP, 1976), 124 pages plus 2 large maps.

Zhou Enlai [Chou En-lai] (1898-1976)

Selected Works

Selected Works of Zhou Enlai, Volume 1, (Beijing: FLP, 1981), 486 pages.

Selected Works of Zhou Enlai, Volume 2, (Beijing: FLP, 1989), 558 pages.

Four short notes from Minister of Foreign Affairs Chou En-lai to the U.N., regarding China’s rightful seat in the United Nations. These are included in the pamphlet Complete and Consolidate the Victory (Peking: FLP, May 1950), on pages 41-46.

Documents Concerning Premier Chou En-lai’s Visit to India and Burma, 4 documents including speeches and joint statements by Zhou Enlai. A supplement to the magazine People’s China, 1954, 14, July 16, 1954, 8 pages.

Report on the Question of Intellectuals, by Chou En-lai, Jan. 14, 1956, (Peking: FLP, 1956), 48 pages.

Political Report, by Chou En-lai, delivered at the Second Session of the Second National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference on January 30, 1956. (Peking: FLP, 1956), 51 pages.

Report on the Proposals for the Second Five-Year Plan for Development of the National Economy, by Chou En-lai, a speech delivered at the Eighth National Congress of the Communist Party of China on September 16, 1956. This is the second part of a pamphlet which includes the Proposals of the Eighth National Congress of the Communist Party of China for the Second Five-Year Plan for Development of the National Economy (1958-1962). Chou’s speech only.

Current Tasks of Reforming the Written Language, by Chou En-lai, 23 pages. [This is from the 2nd edition (revised translation) of the pamphlet Reform of the Chinese Written Language, (Peking: FLP, 1965) Chou’s speech only.

Premier Chou En-lai’s Statement on the Situation in the Taiwan Straits Area, September 6, 1958. Included in the pamphlet Oppose U.S. Military Provocations in the Taiwan Straits Area – A Selection of Important Documents, (Peking: FLP, 1958), 83 pages. (See pages 2-6.)

Premier Chou En-lai’s Speech at the Reception Given by Korean Ambassador Celebrating the National Day of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (Excerpts), September 9, 1958. Included in the pamphlet Oppose U.S. Military Provocations in the Taiwan Straits Area – A Selection of Important Documents, (Peking: FLP, 1958), 83 pages. (See pages 22-23.)

Report on the Work of the Government, by Chou En-lai, delivered at the Second National People’s Congress on April 18, 1959. (Peking: FLP, 1959), 80 pages.

A Great Decade, by Chou En-lai, 1959. Summing up the achievements of the country in the decade since the founding of the People’s Republic of China. (Peking: FLP, 1959), 45 pages.

Premier Chou En-lai’s Speech at Rumania’s National Day Reception Given by the Rumanian Ambassador to China, August 23, 1968, 9 pages. From the pamphlet Total Bankruptcy of Soviet Modern Revisionism, (Peking: FLP, 1968) Chou’s speech only.

Premier Chou En-lai’s Speech at Vietnam’s National Day Reception Given by the Vietnamese Ambassador to China, September 2, 1968, 12 pages. From the pamphlet Total Bankruptcy of Soviet Modern Revisionism, (Peking: FLP, 1968) Chou’s speech only.

Premier Chou En-lai’s Speech at the Reception Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Founding of the People’s Republic of China, September 30, 1969, 10 pages. From the pamphlet Fight for the Further Consolidation of the Dictatorship of the Proletariat – In Celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Founding of the People’s Republic of China. (Peking: FLP, 1969) Chou’s speech only.

Writings About Zhou Enlai

We Will Always Remember Premier Chou En-lai, a collection of articles and photographs, (Peking: FLP, 1977), 220 pages.

Zhu De [Chu Teh] (1886-1976)

Selected Works

Selected Works of Zhu De, 1st ed., (Peking: FLP, 1984), 454 pages.

The Battle Front of the Liberated Areas, by Chu Teh. This was the military report given on April 25, 1945 to the Seventh Congress of the CCP. This is the 3rd edition (with a revised translation) of the English pamphlet. (Peking: FLP, 1962), 89 pages.

Vice-Chairman Chu Teh’s Speech at the Reception Given by Vietnamese Ambassador Celebrating the National Day of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (Excerpts), September 2, 1958. Included in the pamphlet Oppose U.S. Military Provocations in the Taiwan Straits Area – A Selection of Important Documents, (Peking: FLP, 1958), 83 pages. (See page 21.)

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China Policy Study Group

The Red Flag of the Party

The Red Flag of the Party

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China Policy Study Group

The China Policy Study Group (CPSG) was a group of Left academics in Britain sympathetic and supportive of the Chinese Revolution. They were sponsored by Dr. Joseph Needham, Professor Cyril Offord, Professor Joan Robinson and Professor George Thomson. They published a number of books and pamphlets (including a series of three significant books by George Thomson). They also published a monthly magazine, China Policy Study Group Broadsheet, from January 1964 until December 1981, with one final, special issue in May 1982.

The CPSG probably played a positive role in spreading the ideas of the Chinese Revolution amongst the British Left but don’t seem to have a) really understood Maoism, b) didn’t really accept the true significance of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution and c) never understood the meaning and consequences of a ‘revolution is not a dinner party’.

After the death of Chairman Mao they didn’t see the coup d’etat of the ‘capitalist-roaders’ in the Communist Party of China against the revolutionaries within the Party – who were derided as the so-called ‘Gang of Four’. From 1977 to the final issue in may of 1982 they seemed to accept the moving of Chinese society from the revolutionary road to that of the full scale restoration of capitalism without any problems.

The cessation of the publication of the monthly Broadsheet was, therefore, no real loss.

Marxism In China Today, by George Thomson, 1965, 16 pages. This pre-Cultural Revolution pamphlet is a slightly expanded form of a lecture first given on March 15, 1965, under the auspices of the China Policy Study Group.

From Marx to Mao Tse-tung: A Study in Revolutionary Dialectics, by George Thomson, (London: China Policy Study Group, 1971), 96 double pages. Though written over 40 years ago, this is still a fine introduction to revolutionary Marxism. It includes a great many quotations from Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Mao and others, all arranged in a way to illustrate the overall coherence and unity of MLM theory.

Capitalism and After: The Rise and Fall of Commodity Production, by George Thomson, (London: China Policy Study Group, 1973), 162 pages. A continuation of the above volume, focusing here on the political economy of capitalism and socialism. Like the first volume, it includes many quotations from Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Mao and others.

The Human Essence: The Sources of Science and Art, by George Thomson, (London: China Policy Study Group, 1974), 132 pages. The third and final volume of Thomson’s introduction to Marxism, which together cover the political, historical and ideological aspects of the subject. This volume, however, is based to a somewhat greater degree on Thomson’s own thinking and work.

Mao’s Last Battle — The Next Stage, by Bruce Smith, China Policy Study Group (London), 1978, 36 pages. This pamphlet focuses on supporting Hua Kuo-feng (Hua Guofeng) and attacking the so-called Gang of Four, with only mild and limited criticism of Deng Xiaoping.

Index for 1964-1981, 10 pages

1969 Volume 6

7 – July 1969, 4 pages

9 – September 1969, 4 pages

10 – October 1969, 8 pages

11 – November 1969, 4 pages

12 – December 1969, 4 pages

Volume 6 Index, 1 page

1970 Volume 7

1 – January 1970, 4 pages

2 – February 1970, 4 pages

3 – March 1970, 4 pages

8 – August 1970, 4 pages

9 – September 1970, 4 pages

1971 Volume 8

No issues available for this year.

1972 Volume 9

6 – June 1972, 4 pages

7 – July 1972, 4 pages

10 – October 1972, 4 pages

1973 Volume 10

11 – November 1973, 4 pages

12 – December 1973, 4 pages

1974 Volume 11

2 – February 1974, 4 pages

3 – March 1974, 4 pages

4 – April 1974, 4 pages

5 – May 1974, 4 pages

6 – June 1974, 4 pages

7 – July 1974, 4 pages

8 – August 1974, 4 pages

9 – September 1974, 4 pages

10 – October 1974, 8 pages

11 – November 1974, 4 pages

12 – December 1974, 4 pages

1975 Volume 12

1 – January 1975, 4 pages

2 – February 1975, 4 pages

3 – March 1975, 4 pages

4 – April 1975, 4 pages

5 – May 1975, 4 pages

6 – June 1975, 4 pages

8 – August 1975, 4 pages

9 – September 1975, 4 pages

10 – October 1975, 4 pages

11 – November 1975, 4 pages

12 – December 1975, 4 pages

1976 Volume 13

1 – January 1976, 4 pages

2 – February 1976, 4 pages

3 – March 1976, 4 pages

4 – April 1976, 4 pages

5 – May 1976, 4 pages

6 – June 1976, 4 pages

8 – August 1976, 4 pages

9 – September 1976, Special Issue on Mao’s Death, 8 pages

1977 Volume 14

1 – January 1977, 4 pages

2 – February 1977, 4 pages

3 – March 1977, 4 pages

4 – April 1977, 4 pages

5 – May 1977, 4 pages

6 – June 1977, 4 pages

7 – July 1977, 4 pages

8 – August 1977, 4 pages

9 – September 1977, 4 pages

10 – October 1977, 4 pages

11 – November 1977, 4 pages

12 – December 1977, 4 pages

1978 Volume 15

1 – January 1978, 4 pages

2 – February 1978, 4 pages

1979 Volume 16

4 – April 1979, 4 pages

5 – May 1979, 4 pages

6/7 – June-July 1979, 8 pages

9 – September 1979, 4 pages

10 – October 1979, 4 pages

11 – November 1979, 4 pages

12 – December 1979, 4 pages

1980 Volume 17

1 – January 1980, 4 pages

2 – February 1980, 4 pages

3 – March 1980, 4 pages

4 – April 1980, 4 pages

5 – May 1980, 4 pages

8 – August 1980, 4 pages

10 – October 1980, 4 pages

11/12 – November-December 1980, 6 pages

1981 Volume 18

1 – January 1981, 4 pages

2 – February 1981, 4 pages

3 – March 1981, 4 pages

4 – April 1981, 4 pages

6/7 – June-July 1981, 8 pages

8 – August 1981, 4 pages

9 – September 1981, 4 pages. (The CPSG announced in this issue that regular publication of the Broadsheet would cease in December 1981.)

10 – October 1981, 4 pages

11 – November 1981, 4 pages

12 – December 1981, 8 pages

1982

Special Issue – May 1982, 8 pages

When the CPSG announced the cessation of the monthly publication from the end of 1981 they suggested that there might be an occasional publication in the future. This ‘Special’ really came out to announce that the option wasn’t feasible and so this was definitely the last of the series that had been published since 1964.

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