Zimbabwe News and other magazines

The struggle continues

The struggle continues

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Zimbabwe News and other magazines

Zimbabwe News

Zimbabwe News was a magazine that was first produced by the Zimbabwean African National Union (ZANU) in 1969 when the movement was in its early stages. At that time the organisation (in Britain) was lobbying the then Labour Government of Harold Wilson to reverse its stance on the Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) made by the Ian Smith regime in November 1965.

When the struggle within Rhodesia took on the aspects of a fully fledged National Liberation War, starting with guerrilla tactics and then progressing to more ambitious attacks, the magazine kept the world informed of events in the country.

After Independence in 1980 the magazine became the official organ of the ruling party of Zimbabwe.

1970 – Volume 2

01 – January

07 – December

1986 – Volume 17

10 – October

11 – November

12 – December

1987 – Volume 18

01 – January

01 – January (Special Issue)

02 – February

03 – March

04 – April

05/06 – May/June

07 – July

08 – August

11 – November

1988 – Volume 19

01 – January

02 – February

03 – April

05 – May

06 – June

07 – July

09 – September

10 – October

12 – December

1989 – Volume 20

01 – January

02 – February

03 – March

04 – April

05 – May

06 – June

07 – July

08 – August

09 – September

10 – October

11 – November

12 – December

1990 – Volume 21

01 – January

02 – February

03 – March

04 – April

05 – May

07 – August/September

08 – October/November

09 – December

1991 – Volume 22

01 – January/February

02 – March/April

04 – August

1992 – Volume 23

01 – January

03 – April

04 – May

05 – July/August

06 – September/October

07 – November

08 – December

1993 – Volume 24

01 – January

02 – February

03/04 – March/April

Social change and development

An occasional magazine which tended to look at a specific topic in more detail in each issue. Don’t know for how long it was published.

1983

Number 04 – Health

Number 05 – Economy

1984

Number 07 – Housing and Resettlement

Number 08 – The State

Number 09 – International Aid

Number 10 – Five Years of Independence

1985

Number 11 – The ‘Disadvantaged’

Number 12 – The 1985 General Election

1986

Number 13 – Women

Number 14 – Food and farming

Number 15 – The Non-Aligned Movement and the struggle against Imperialism and Colonialism

Number 15 – Supplement – Fidel Castro at 8th Non-Aligned Movement meeting in September 1982

1987

Number 16 – Industry and Technology

Number 16 – Supplement – Samora Machel and Joaquim Chissano

Spotlight on Zimbabwe

Published by the Zimbabwe Ministry of Information, Posts and Telecommunications.

Volume 5, No 1

Volume 5, No 2

Volume 6, No 1

The Voice

The publication of the South African Development Co-ordinating Conference/Preferential Trade Agreement. It’s reproduced here to give an idea of how commercial thinking was developing in Zimbabwe towards the end of the 1980s.

Volume 1, No 1, February 1987

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Zimbabwe – post-Independence

Rally at Martyrs' Cemetery

Rally at Martyrs’ Cemetery

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Zimbabwe – post-Independence

Zimbabwe in the early days of independence – aims, aspirations and difficulties to be faced.

Education for a National Culture, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Zimbabwe Publishing House, Harare, 1981, 16 pages.

Makers of History – Who’s Who of Nationalist Leaders in Zimbabwe, Diana Mitchell, Harare, 1983, 185 pages.

The Kadoma Declaration, July 31, 1983, Government Printers, Harare, 1983, 4 pages.

Conference on Food Production Co-operatives at the University of Zimbabwe, Harare 5-12th June 1985, 59 pages.

Co-operatives – What about them, Ministry of Education, Harare, 1985, 47 pages.

Women at Work, Report of the Woman’s Action Group Workshop, Harare, January 1985, 14 pages.

Zimbabwe – at 5 years of independence, Rebuilding Zimbabwe – Achievements, problems and prospects, ZANU(PF), Department of the Commissariat and Culture, Harare, 1985, 265 pages.

Zimbabwe – Prevention of Corruption Act, Zimbabwe Parliament, Government Printers, Harare, 1985, 16 pages.

Zimbabwean Women in Industry, Patricia Made and Birgitta Lagerstrom, Zimbabwe Publishing House, Harare, 1985, 60 pages.

African Perspectives on Non-alignment, ed by Jinadu and Mandaza, African Association of Political Science, Harare, 1986, 74 pages.

Education in Zimbabwe – Past, Present and Future, Zimbabwe Foundation for Education with Production, Harare, 1986, 152 pages.

First Five-Year National Development Plan 1986-1990, Volume 1, Government Printers, Harare, April 1986, 54 pages.

The Women of Zimbabwe, Ruth Weiss, Keshu, London, 1986, 151 pages.

Zimbabwe – The Political Economy of Transition, 1980-1986, ed. Ibbo Mandaza, Codesria, London, 1986, 430 pages.

Reorganisation of Parastatals in Zimbabwe, Paper presented at the Public Enterprise Seminar: Focus on Role, Performance and Management of Parastatals, organised by Conference Promtion Services (Pvt) Ltd, Harare, Sipho Shabalala, Harare, 1987, 19 pages.

The philosophy of the Working Class, NCG Mathema, Memorial Co-operative Society, Harare, 1987, 24 pages.

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Robert Mugabe – writings and speeches

Robert Mugabe 1986

Robert Mugabe 1986

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Robert Mugabe (1924-2019)

Robert Mugabe became the leader of the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU) in 1975 – at the height of the National Liberation War against the racist and colonial regime of Rhodesia – eventually leading the organisation (and the people of Zimbabwe) to success and the establishment of a Government led by and comprising a majority of Black Zimbabweans.

In the 1970s and 80s he professed himself a Marxist-Leninist but as international pressures and economic difficulties increased during the 1990s his approach became more ‘pragmatic’ – although he always considered himself a socialist.

In many ways Mugabe was the only honourable participant in the Lancaster House Conference in late 1979. He accepted a disproportionate participation in the Parliament of the tiny white minority in order to undermine any arguments of the odious Ian Smith – the erstwhile Prime Minister of the renegade country since the 1960s . This agreement was due to last for ten years and probably one of Mubabe’s biggest mistakes was that he honoured that agreement.

If he had attacked white majority power during the 1980s, when there was definitely a revolutionary fervour in the country, Zimbabwe might had been more able to face the various ‘setbacks’ of the 1990s. These were a combination of events which, using the modern cliché, created a veritable ‘perfect storm’ for the country.

The events that hit the country included;

  • droughts in the 1990s, which followed drought years in the 1980s,
  • the collapse of the Soviet Union removed a potential, non-Western ally (although with conditions) from the equation,
  • the refusal of the governments of the United Kingdom (both Conservative and Labour) to live up to their end of the bargain and provide assistance (including finance) for the white minority land (the very best, most fertile and most easily irrigated) to be transferred into the hands of black Zimbabwean farmers,
  • a growing level of corruption at too many levels in the Party, Government and the country in general which were undermining any attempts to move forward without any interference from the past colonial ‘masters’,
  • the efforts of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank (WB) to force conditions upon any country receiving loans. This primarily manifested itself in the forced privatisation of national resources – a policy which was developed throughout the 1980s but which had become institutionalised by the 1990s. The fact that, throughout his time as Prime Minster/President, Mugabe refused to accept such conditions must always stand in his favour.

The documents below allow the reader to get an idea of how Mugabe thought during the time of the National Liberation War and the early years of the independent Zimbabwe.

Prime Minister opens Economic Conference, September 1, 1980, Harare, 1980, Government Printer, Harare, 1980, 6 pages.

PM’s New Year Message to the Nation, December 31, 1981, Policy Statement No 6, Government Printer, Harare, 1981, 9 pages.

PM opens Zimbabwe Conference on Reconstruction and Development (ZIMCORD), March 23, 1981, Government Printer, Harare, 11 pages.

Speech by the Honourable Prime Minister, Comrade R.G. Mugabe, at the 69th Session of the International Labour Organisation, Geneva Switzerland, June 15 1983, no publisher or publication date, 15 pages. (Apologies for the poor quality of the print.)

Prime Minister Addresses State Banquet in North Korea, October 9, 1980, Policy Statement No 1, Government Printer, Harare, 1985, 14 pages.

The Prime Minister’s speech in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, January 24, 1983, Policy Statement No 9, Harare, Government Printer, Harare, 1983, 6 pages.

The Prime Minister’s Speech to Ecclesiastical Leaders, April 5, 1983, Policy Statement No 11, Government Printer, Harare, 1983, 8 pages.

The President’s speech on the 3rd anniversary of Independence, April 18, 1983, Policy Statement No 10, Government Printers, Harare, 1983, 9 pages.

Our war of Liberation, Speeches, articles and interviews, 1976-1979, Mambo Press, Harare, 1983, 215 pages.

The Construction of Socialism in Zimbabwe, Prime Minister, July 9, 1984, Policy Statement No 14, Government Printers, Harare, 1984, 11 pages.

The President’s speech at the opening of the 1st session of the 2nd Parliament of Zimbabwe, July 23, 1985, Government Printers, Harare, 1985, 12 pages.

PM Mugabe’s address to the 40th Session of the UN General Assembly, October 7, 1985, Policy Statement No 16, Government Printer, Harare, 1985, 14 pages.

The President opens 2nd Session of 2nd Parliament, June 24, 1986, Policy Statement No 17, Government Printers, Harare, 1986, 13 pages.

Biographies

Mugabe, a biography, David Smith and Colin Simpson with Ian Davies, Pioneer Head, Salisbury, 1981, 222 pages.

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