Peking Review – 1964

Long Live the Chinese Communist Party

Long Live the Chinese Communist Party

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Peking Review – 1964

Peking Review was the weekly political and informative magazine published between 1958 and 1978. With issue No 1 of 1979 the magazine was renamed Beijing Review, the new name bringing with it a new direction in the People’s Republic of China and was an open statement of the reintroduction of capitalism in the erstwhile Socialist Republic.

The issues and topics included in 1964:

  • Fighting tasks of workers in philosophy and social sciences
  • Chairman Mao Tse-tung‘s New Poems published
  • ‘Walking on two legs’ in education
  • Report from Shansi People’s Commune
  • The leaders of the CPSU are the greatest splitters of our time
  • China’s Socialist Commerce
  • Chinese medicine: progress and achievements
  • Firm support for Palestinian and Arab people
  • The Proletarian Revolution and Khrushchov’s Revisionism
  • Afro-Asian solidarity grows in anti-Imperialist struggle
  • Seven letters exchanged between Central Committees of CPC and CPSU
  • China’s sovereignty over Taiwan brooks no intervention
  • New stage in China’s mass movement in industry
  • Peking Opera with contemporary themes
  • China’s State-owned industrial enterprises: their nature and tasks
  • A Great revolution on the Cultural Front
  • ‘Selected Readings of Mao Tse-tung’ published
  • On Khrushchov’s Phoney Communism and its historical lesson for the world
  • Oppose US Aggression! Defend Peace in Indo-China!
  • Peking Opera to serve Socialism
  • The so-called ‘Tonkin Gulf Incident’ – a big hoax
  • Cadres must take part in labour to carry on the Revolution
  • Long Live the General Line for Building Socialism
  • Hold High the Revolutionary Banner of Marxism-Leninism
  • China explodes its first atom bomb
  • Unite under the Banner of the Great October Revolution
  • Price policy in China
  • Why Khrushchov Fell
  • Extension of war will hasten US defeat in S Vietnam
  • In Today’s Tibet

Available issues of Peking Review:

1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978

No. 26 includes an index for issues 1-26 and No. 52 an index for issues 27-52.

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Beijing Review

From issue No. 1 of 1979 the weekly political and informative magazine Peking Review changed its name to Beijing Review. On page 3 of that number the editors made the open declaration of the change in the direction of the erstwhile ‘People’s Republic of China’.

By stating that the Communist Party of China (under the control then of Teng Hsiao-Ping/Deng Xiaoping ) sought

‘to accomplish socialist modernisation by the end of the century and turn China …. into an economically developed and fully democratic socialist country’

the CPC was openly declaring the rejection of the revolutionary path, which the country had been following since 1949, and the adoption of the road that would inevitably lead to the full scale establishment of capitalism.

For those who would like to follow this downward spiral into the murky depths of capitalism and imperialism in the issues of Beijing Review (complete for the years 1979-1990 – intermittently thereafter) you can do so by going to bannedthought – which also serves as an invaluable resource for more material about China during its revolutionary phase.

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