Peking Review – 1973

Long Live the triumph of Chairman Mao's revolutionary line in literature and art

Long Live the triumph of Chairman Mao’s revolutionary line in literature and art

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Peking Review – 1973

Peking Review was the weekly political and informative magazine published between 1958 and 1978. With issue No 1 of 1979 the magazine was renamed Beijing Review, the new name bringing with it a new direction in the People’s Republic of China and was an open statement of the reintroduction of capitalism in the erstwhile Socialist Republic.

The issues and topics included in 1973:

  • China reaps good harvest in 1972
  • How the Party Branch leads the peasants forward – the success story of Shashihyu Production Brigade in Hopei Province
  • Two different worlds – summary of a workers’ forum in Shanghai’s Hutung Shipyard
  • At the home of ‘Peking man’
  • Greeting the signing of the Paris Agreement (on Vietnam)
  • Taking all society as their factory – Peking University’s achievements in educational revolution in the liberal arts
  • Chairman Mao meets Comrades Le Duc Tho and Nguyen Duy Trinh
  • New monetary crisis in capitalist world
  • Chairman Mao meets Dr Kissenger
  • Enlivening studies and accentuating student initiative – on the education reform in tsinghua University
  • Develop the work of the Communist Youth League
  • ‘February 28’ Uprising in Taiwan Province marked
  • Talking of Women’s Liberation
  • Working women are a great revolutionary force
  • Socialist Planned Economy – notes on studying political economy
  • Party building must be closely linked to its poltical line – study notes on Introducing ‘The Communist’
  • Support for Latin American peoples’ just struggle
  • A visit to the Tungting People’s Commune
  • Having faith in and relying on the majority of the masses
  • Powerful force for developing agriculture
  • Oppose big powers seeking hegemony
  • The working class must further play its role as the main force
  • China explains her views on the population question
  • Practising economy – a principle of Socialist Economics
  • Seeing the essence of problems
  • Path of youth – integrating with workers and peasants
  • Reliable way to realise industrialisation
  • Youth should stand in the forefront of the Revolutionary ranks
  • Development of national public health services
  • ‘Barefoot Doctors’ – giving medical treatment while taking part in farm work
  • Another instance of Soviet Revisionists’ sham support, real betrayal
  • Night schools for peasants
  • Laying a firm foundation for the National Economy – notes on the rural areas in Hsishui County
  • Work persistently for the full implementation of the Paris Agreement
  • The workers are the masters – the first in a series of reports on a state-owned factory
  • New Party members – a dynamic force
  • 30th anniversary of the Albanian People’s Army
  • Commune of the Tibetan plateau
  • Economic development and environmental protection
  • No massacre can intimidate the heroic Mozambique people
  • The 3,000-ri land must be reunified – commemorating the 20th anniversary of Korea’s Fatherland Liberation War
  • Training worker-cadres is a task entrusted to us by history
  • Ten years of ‘disarmament’ ballyhoo and ten years of frenzied arms expansion
  • General principle for developing the National Economy
  • Israel’s piratic act and preposterous logic
  • Attach importance to the Revolution in the Superstructure
  • Medical network in a mountain county
  • Tenth National Congress of the Communist Party of China
  • Hail the success of the 4th Summit Conference of Non-aligned Countries
  • Imperialism is the eve of the Social Revolution of the Proletariat
  • Confucius – a thinker who stubbornly upheld the slave system
  • The Arab people’s cause against aggression is invincible
  • Combination of old, middle-aged and young cadres in leading bodies
  • Importance must be attached to the Party’s basic line
  • Security Council discusses ‘supervision of ceasefire’ in the Middle East
  • How China solved its food problem
  • UN debate on Korean question
  • Democratic Centralism in Party Committees
  • Theory of productive forces – its counter-revolutionary essence
  • Communists should work for the interests of the vast majority of people
  • Great benefits derive from a good analysis
  • Salute the struggle of South Korean students
  • How the state helps cultural development in minority areas
  • Lin Piao anti-Party clique – sworn enemy of the Dictatorship of the Proletariat

Available issues of Peking Review:

1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978

There’s an index for the first part of the year in issue No. 26 and one for issues 27 – 52 in No. 52.

Peking Review - 1973 - 01

Peking Review – 1973 – 01

Peking Review - 1973 - 02

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Peking Review - 1973 - 29

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Peking Review - 1973 - 33

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Peking Review - 1973 - 35-36

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Peking Review - 1973 - 37 - Supplement

Peking Review – 1973 – 37 – Supplement

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Peking Review - 1973 - 41

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Peking Review - 1973 - 41 - Supplement

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Peking Review - 1973 - 44

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Peking Review - 1973 - 46 - Supplement

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Peking Review - 1973 - 51

Peking Review – 1973 – 51

Peking Review - 1973 - 52

Peking Review – 1973 – 52

 

 

 

 

 

Beijing Review

From issue No. 1 of 1979 the weekly political and informative magazine Peking Review changed its name to Beijing Review. On page 3 of that number the editors made the open declaration of the change in the direction of the erstwhile ‘People’s Republic of China’.

By stating that the Communist Party of China (under the control then of Teng Hsiao-Ping/Deng Xiaoping ) sought

‘to accomplish socialist modernisation by the end of the century and turn China …. into an economically developed and fully democratic socialist country’

the CPC was openly declaring the rejection of the revolutionary path, which the country had been following since 1949, and the adoption of the road that would inevitably lead to the full scale establishment of capitalism.

For those who would like to follow this downward spiral into the murky depths of capitalism and imperialism in the issues of Beijing Review (complete for the years 1979-1990 – intermittently thereafter) you can do so by going to bannedthought – which also serves as an invaluable resource for more material about China during its revolutionary phase.

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