Peking Review – 1965

Two heroic sisters of the grassland

Two heroic sisters of the grassland

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Peking Review – 1965

Peking Review was the weekly political and informative magazine published between 1958 and 1978. With issue No 1 of 1979 the magazine was renamed Beijing Review, the new name bringing with it a new direction in the People’s Republic of China and was an open statement of the reintroduction of capitalism in the erstwhile Socialist Republic.

The issues and topics included in 1965:

  • Report on the work of the government – Chou En-Lai at 3rd National People’s Congress
  • China condemns US moves to extend war in South Vietnam
  • Seventh Congress of Indian CP
  • Essence of Khrushov’s line of ‘Peaceful Coexistence’
  • New phase in Sino-Indonesian comradeship-in-arms
  • UN is Washington’s tool
  • Armed US-Chiang agents wiped out
  • The role of the People’s Militia
  • Strategy and tactics of People’s War
  • President Ho Chi Minh exposes US ‘Peace’ hoax
  • A great victory for Leninism – 95th anniversary of Lenin’s birth
  • Militant role of China’s trade unions
  • China successfully explodes another atom bomb
  • Great victory of Indonesian CP’s Marxist-Leninist line
  • How China implements policy of self-reliance
  • China’s stable monetary system
  • China is well prepared to assist Vietnam against US aggression
  • Conditions ripening for a new economic crisis in US
  • Industrial management in China
  • ‘Polemics on the General Line of the International Communist Movement’
  • Technical co-operation boosts production
  • Tito clique serves US on Vietnam question
  • Chou En-Lai visits Albania
  • Taiwan must be liberated
  • A good summer harvest
  • Millions of educated youth go to the countryside
  • Two diametrically opposed lines in World Peace Movement
  • Democratic tradition of the Chinese People’s Army
  • Growing crops in saline soil
  • Guide for 500 million peasants advancing on Socialist road
  • Problems of strategy in guerrilla war against Japan – Mao Tse-tung
  • Long live the victory of People’s War – Lin Piao
  • Great revolutionary changes in Tibet
  • China’s 16th National Day
  • Fruits of cultural revolution
  • Drastic changes in Indonesian political situation
  • Significance of commemorating Dr Sun Yat-sen
  • Forge ahead along the path of the Great October Revolution
  • War plot of US-Japanese reactionaries condemned
  • US Imperialism and Revisionism must be opposed
  • Health work serves the peasants
  • Young spare-time writers meet
  • China ready to take up US challenge – Chou En-lai

Available issues of Peking Review:

1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978

Issue No. 26 contained an index for the numbers from 1-26. Issue No. 52 for numbers 27-52.

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Beijing Review

From issue No. 1 of 1979 the weekly political and informative magazine Peking Review changed its name to Beijing Review. On page 3 of that number the editors made the open declaration of the change in the direction of the erstwhile ‘People’s Republic of China’.

By stating that the Communist Party of China (under the control then of Teng Hsiao-Ping/Deng Xiaoping ) sought

‘to accomplish socialist modernisation by the end of the century and turn China …. into an economically developed and fully democratic socialist country’

the CPC was openly declaring the rejection of the revolutionary path, which the country had been following since 1949, and the adoption of the road that would inevitably lead to the full scale establishment of capitalism.

For those who would like to follow this downward spiral into the murky depths of capitalism and imperialism in the issues of Beijing Review (complete for the years 1979-1990 – intermittently thereafter) you can do so by going to bannedthought – which also serves as an invaluable resource for more material about China during its revolutionary phase.

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