Leningrad (Saint Petersburg) Metro – Avtovo – Line 1

Avtovo - Alex 'Florstein' Fedorov

Avtovo – Alex ‘Florstein’ Fedorov

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Moscow Metro – the world’s biggest Socialist Realist Art Gallery

Leningrad (Saint Petersburg) Metro – Avtovo – Line 1

Avtovo - 04

Avtovo – 04

Avtovo (Russian: А́втово) is a station on the Kirovsko-Vyborgskaya Line of the Saint Petersburg Metro. Designed by architect Yevgenii Levinson, it opened as part of the first Leningrad Metro line on November 15, 1955. In 2014, The Guardian included it on the list of 12 most beautiful metro stations in the world.

Avtovo - 02

Avtovo – 02

Avtovo’s unique and highly ornate design features columns faced with ornamental glass manufactured at the Lomonosov factory. Although the original plan envisaged using glass on all of the columns in the station, white marble was substituted on some due to time constraints. This marble was supposed to be temporary, but it has never been replaced. The walls are faced with white marble and adorned on the north side by a row of ornamental ventilation grilles. At the end of the platform a mosaic by V.A. Voronetskiy and A.K. Sokolov commemorates the Leningrad Blockade (1941-1944) during the Second World War.

Avtovo - 03

Avtovo – 03

Unlike the other stations on the first line, Avtovo is a shallow-level station, constructed using the cut and cover method. It belongs to the shallow column class of underground stations.

Avtovo - 01

Avtovo – 01

Avtovo has as its entrance vestibule a large Neoclassical building with a domed cupola, located on the east side of Prospekt Stachek.

Text from Wikipedia.

Location:

Kirovsky District

GPS:

59°52′02.37″N

30°15′40.87″E

Depth:

12m (39ft)

Opened:

November 15, 1955

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Moscow Metro – Komsomolskaya – Line 1

Komsomolskaya - by Ludvig14

Komsomolskaya – by Ludvig14

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Moscow Metro – a Socialist Realist Art Gallery

Moscow Metro – Komsomolskaya – Line 1

Komsomolskaya - Line 1 - 02

Komsomolskaya – Line 1 – 02

Komsomolskaya (Комсомо́льская) is a Moscow Metro station in the Krasnoselsky District, Central Administrative Okrug, Moscow. It is on the Sokolnicheskaya line, between Krasnye Vorota and Krasnoselskaya stations. It is located under Komsomolskaya Square, between the Leningradsky, Yaroslavsky, and Kazansky railway terminals. The station was named for the workers of the Komsomol youth league who helped to construct the first Metro line. It has a transfer at its namesake on the Koltsevaya line.

Komsomolskaya - Line 1 - 01

Komsomolskaya – Line 1 – 01

Komsomolskaya was built using the cut and cover method, with construction beginning on 3 May 1933. Temporary bridges were built over the construction site to avoid disrupting traffic, especially the numerous tram routes in the area. To counteract the high water table, the station was built on 636 piles which were driven into the saturated soil.

Komsomolskaya - Line 1 - 04

Komsomolskaya – Line 1 – 04

Heavy rains in the summer of 1934 threatened the construction site several times, and at one point even the Kazansky terminal was in danger of collapsing. Nevertheless, the concrete structure of the station was completed by August 26 and Komsomolskaya opened on schedule on May 15, 1935.

Komsomolskaya - Line 1 - 05

Komsomolskaya – Line 1 – 05

Due to Komsomolskaya’s location under a major transit hub, the station was built with an unusual upper gallery above the platform to help handle rush crowds. The station has tall pillars faced with pinkish limestone and topped with bronze capitals displaying the emblem of the Komsomol league. The station was designed by Dmitry Chechulin, and a model of it was displayed at the 1937 Paris World’s fair.

Komsomolskaya - Line 1 - 03

Komsomolskaya – Line 1 – 03

The station’s southern entrance vestibule is built into the Kazansky Rail Terminal. The northern vestibule is on the opposite side of the square, between the Leningradsky and Yaroslavsky rail terminals. The latter entrance did not survive in its original form, having been replaced with a massive structure serving both this station and the Koltsevaya line station in 1952. There is a short branch line between Komsomolskaya and Krasnoselskaya stations, that leads to the Severnoe Depot. On 15 October 1934 the first Metro train left this depot for a trial run.

Text from Wikipedia.

Location:

GPS:

55.7753°N

37.6562°E

Depth:

8 metres (26 ft)

Opened:

15 May 1935

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Moscow Metro – a Socialist Realist Art Gallery

Moscow Metro – Frunzenskaya – Line 1

Frunzenskaya

Frunzenskaya

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Moscow Metro – a Socialist Realist Art Gallery

Moscow Metro – Frunzenskaya – Line 1

Frunzenskaya 04

Frunzenskaya 04

Frunzenskaya (Фру́нзенская) is a Metro station on the Sokolnicheskaya Line in Moscow, Russia. The station was opened on 1 May 1957 as the first stage of the extension of the Frunzenskiy radius. As the radius follows the bend of the Moskva river, the whole segment had to be built very deep (42 metres/138 ft for Frunzenskaya).

Frunzenskaya 01

Frunzenskaya 01

The station closed on 2 January 2016 for renovation, which was expected to last 14 months. The renovations were completed ahead of schedule with the station reopening on December 29, 2016. The renovations included the installation of four new escalators to replace the three that had been in place. Metro authorities projected that the new escalators would reduce energy consumption by 40% and increase the capacity by one-third.

Frunzenskaya 03

Frunzenskaya 03

The station is also symbolic as being one of the last in Moscow to be fully built in Stalinist style which dominated the Metro Architecture since the mid-1940s, afterwards the station designs show evidence of more vivid decorations that were meant to be installed yet designs were simplified (examples include the station VDNKh and Alexeyevskaya). Frunzenskaya still stands out and architects Robert Pogrebnoi and Yuriy Zenkivich applied a pylon design with cream marbled vaults and tops of pylons, decorated with metallic shields containing a five-sided star. The bottom of Pylons are a form of a thicker red marble base. Suspended from the ceiling are massive eight-horned chandeliers. The floor is covered with black and red granite on floors and the walls are faced with white ceramic tiles.

Frunzenskaya 02

Frunzenskaya 02

In the far end of the station, in front of a red-marbled semicircle is a bust to Mikhail Frunze (work of sculptor Yevgeny Vuchetich), a famous military commander in the Russian Civil War for whom the station is named.

Frunzenskaya 05

Frunzenskaya 05

The station’s massive vestibule (architects Nadia Bykova, Ivan Taranov, I.G. Cherepanov, I.G.Gokhar-Kharmandaryan, N.I.Demchinskiy and T.A.Ilina) is situated on the Komsomolskiy Avenue and Kholzunov side-street was partially demolished and built into the Moscow’s Palace of Youth building in 1984. Presently receives a daily passenger traffic of 47,410. Also behind the station is a junction for a branch to the Koltsevaya Line used for transfers.

Frunzenskaya 06

Frunzenskaya 06

Text from Wikipedia.

Location:

GPS:

55.7267°N

37.5786°E

Opened:

1 May 1957

Depth:

42 metres (138 ft)

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Moscow Metro – a Socialist Realist Art Gallery