Peking Review – 1977

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It makes me happy to contribute

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Peking Review – 1977

Peking Review was the weekly political and informative magazine published between 1958 and 1978. With issue No 1 of 1979 the magazine was renamed Beijing Review, the new name bringing with it a new direction in the People’s Republic of China and was an open statement of the reintroduction of capitalism in the erstwhile Socialist Republic.

The issues and topics included in 1977:

The ‘capitalist-roaders’ were able to gain positions of power soon after Comrade Mao’s death in September 1976. The pages of Peking Review in 1977 continued to show how they attempted to justify their efforts to turn the revolution from the Socialist road by using the words of Chairman Mao. Also, there’s no better way of understanding their capitalist and revisionist tactics than by seeing how they attacked the so-called ‘Gang of Four’ – who were losing the struggle against those seeking to destroy the Chinese Revolution.

  • On the Ten Major Relationships – Mao Tse-tung, April 25th 1956 (Volume V)
  • Important Speech by Chairman Hua Kuo-feng
  • The crux of the ‘Gang of Four’s’ crimes is to usurp Party and State Power
  • 1976 in retrospect: Soviet Détente fraud exposed
  • Premier Chou in the Great Cultural Revolution
  • Premier Chou creatively carried out Chairman Mao’s revolutionary line in foreign affairs
  • Wang Hung-wen’s scheme to throw China into disorder exposed
  • The ‘Gang of Four’ and the Trotskyites
  • A straight race between the two Superpowers
  • Mechanisation: fundamental way out for agriculture
  • 30th anniversary of ‘February 28’ uprising by the people of Taiwan Province commemorated
  • Ferreting out ‘the bourgeoisie in the army’ – another ‘Gang of Four’ scheme
  • How the ‘Gang of Four’ opposed Socialist modernisation
  • The basic policy for Socialist Revolution and construction
  • How the ‘Gang of Four’ stamped on the Party’s policy on intellectuals
  • Invasion of Zaire by Soviet-paid mercenaries is intolerable
  • Chairman Mao’s note on ‘Charter of Anshan Iron and Steel Company’
  • A complete reversal of the relations between ourselves and the enemy – a criticism of the ‘Gang of Four’s’ distortion of Chairman Mao’s directive
  • Carry out in an all-round way the strategic policy decision on grasping the key link in running the country well
  • A serious struggle in scientific and technical circles
  • Volume V of ‘Selected Works of Chairman Mao Tse-tung’ published
  • National Conference on Learning from Taching in Industry opens
  • Continue the Revolution under the Dictatorship of the Proletariat to the end – Hua Kuo-feng
  • Construction of Chairman Mao Memorial Hall completed
  • Reactionary essence of new Soviet Constitution
  • Use Chairman Mao’s theory of continuing the revolution to guide Socialist construction
  • Commemorating 27th anniversary of Korean Fatherland Liberation War
  • Self-reliance and making foreign things serve China
  • Soviet social-imperialism – most dangerous source of world war
  • The Atom Bomb is a paper tiger
  • The Third Plenary Session of the Tenth Central Committee of the Communist Party of China
  • The 50th anniversary of the Founding of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army
  • In memory of the esteemed and beloved Comrade Chu Teh
  • In memory of Comrades Ho Lung and Chen Yi
  • The 11th National Congress of the Communist Party of China
  • President Tito in Peking
  • Constitution of the Communist Party of China
  • Chairman Mao’s two works – ‘Strive to learn from each other and don’t stick to the beaten track and be complacent’ (1963) and ‘On the question of whether Imperialism and all reactionaries are paper tigers’ (1958) (Volume V)
  • The 28th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China
  • Why did the ‘Gang of Four’ attack ‘The Twenty Points’?
  • The struggle around the Outline Report on Science and Technology
  • Chairman Mao’s ‘Theory of the Differentiation of the Three Worlds’ is a major contribution to Marxism-Leninism
  • The banner of the October Revolution is invincible
  • Revive and carry forward the fine style of our Party
  • Third world countries unite against hegemonism in economic sphere
  • Criticising eclecticism or attacking the ‘Theory of Two Points’?
  • The two-line struggle in the economic field during the transition period
  • A great debate on the educational front
  • Chairman Mao’s works – ‘China will take a giant stride forward’ (December 13, 1964) and ‘A letter on farm mechanisation’ (March 12, 1966)

Available issues of Peking Review:

1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978

There’s an index for the first part of the year in issue No. 26 and one for issues 27 – 52 in No. 52.

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Beijing Review

From issue No. 1 of 1979 the weekly political and informative magazine Peking Review changed its name to Beijing Review. On page 3 of that number the editors made the open declaration of the change in the direction of the erstwhile ‘People’s Republic of China’.

By stating that the Communist Party of China (under the control then of Teng Hsiao-Ping/Deng Xiaoping ) sought

‘to accomplish socialist modernisation by the end of the century and turn China …. into an economically developed and fully democratic socialist country’

the CPC was openly declaring the rejection of the revolutionary path, which the country had been following since 1949, and the adoption of the road that would inevitably lead to the full scale establishment of capitalism.

For those who would like to follow this downward spiral into the murky depths of capitalism and imperialism in the issues of Beijing Review (complete for the years 1979-1990 – intermittently thereafter) you can do so by going to bannedthought – which also serves as an invaluable resource for more material about China during its revolutionary phase.

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