The ferry from Corfu to Saranda – what you need to know

Hydrofoil Kristi docked at Saranda

Hydrofoil Kristi docked at Saranda

One of the best ways into Albania is via the ferry from Corfu to Saranda in southern Albania. What follows is the practical information of what you need to know to make that process easy and – hopefully – trouble free.

I’ve been to Albania three times now, so far, and each time via Corfu. The first time I arrived late at night and was expecting to leave on the ferry the next morning. That was thwarted due to an annual safety check on the hydrofoil (so I was told though I heard a different story in Saranda) which meant there was no departure for three days. The second time everything went as it should and the journey was made much easier due to my previous experience. What surprised me the most was there was no way I could find detailed information about the logistics of getting across a relatively narrow stretch of water. This posting is an attempt to give an as up to date and accurate step by step approach to getting from one country to another as is possible.

Where you buy your tickets depends upon the time of year. During the high season, when there is more than one sailing a day, there is a kiosk just inside the main New Port entrance, to the left backing on to the main road. However, outside of the months of June to September tickets are only sold in the company’s office.

This is the head office of Ionian Cruises. That’s a grand title but it’s based in small shop facing the Domestic Terminal building, which also houses the biggest café in the area (as well as a left luggage office) on the road that runs parallel to the sea. There is a small sign indicating that they sell tickets to Albania (in English).

All the details I’ve been able to collect are as follows:

Ionian Cruises – Petrakis Lines, 4, Ethnikis Antistaseos, 49100 Corfu, Hellas,

Tel. : +0030 26610 38690, 31649, 25155

Fax : +0030 26610 38787, 26555

The office is open from 08.00. and the people who work in there speak English, which makes life easier for some of us non-Greek speakers.

You need your passport and you MUST buy a ticket before going to the boat. As of February 2017 the adult cost is  €19 each way. The cost increases to €23.80 from mid-June to mid-September. Children go for half price. Departure Times (all year) are at 09.00, but with 2 or 3 extra sailings from the middle of June to the middle of September. The latest sailing from Corfu is 18.30.

The hydrofoil leaves from the top end of the new port. This means that after buying your ticket in the office you have to get to the main entrance to the Port of Corfu which is about 400m along the road, heading out of Corfu town. Once through the main gates turn left and head to the New Passenger Terminal, the sandy coloured building about a 100m away. Here you will get your passport and ticket checked. There is also a small Duty Free shop but few other facilities.

Duration of journey: 30 minutes.

Once on board leave your bag at your seat (or at the luggage store by the entrance) and go right to the back of the boat and get a sensation of speed without being blinded by the spray that obscures any sightseeing from the cabin. The boats are Kristi and Santa III, Komet class hydrofoils, not that young any more but still up to the task in hand.

Remember to put your watches/time pieces forward one hour when landing on Albanian soil (you effectively arrive before you have left!).

There are no visa requirements for citizens of the European Union, citizens of other countries should check first. Passport formalities are remarkably innocuous on entering (or leaving) Albania. The passport will be scanned and recorded on the immigration service computer. You normally get a stamp in your passport if arriving or leaving by boat but this is not always the case at land borders. The lack of a stamp took me by surprise the first time I entered by land, from Greece, but later learnt that this is common and you shouldn’t be concerned if there is no entry stamp.

Once you leave passport/customs control you might well be approached by Tomi. He’s an English-speaking Albanian who runs a basic hostel less than 100m from the port entrance. If you are new to the country, want to meet other foreign visitors to pick their brains about what/when/where the hostel is a good place for all of this. Tomi also is a mine of information and if he doesn’t know the answers will almost certainly know someone who does. If you miss him you can call his mobile, +355694345426.

Another good place to check out is the Dolphin Hostel, located at 168, Rruga Lefter Talo. This is just above the street Rruga Flamurit, which is effectively Saranda’s interurban bus station.

The ticket office to get tickets to Corfu is in the building on the main road, directly above the dock. The name over the office is Finikas Lines. Sailings from Saranda are at 12.45/13.00 for most of the year. There are extra sailings in the peak season.

Recommendations

So now you’ve arrived in Albania (hopefully without too many problems) what do you do? If the beach is your thing then I don’t have a lot to say. Enjoy it but when you get bored with the sun I suggest you consider some – or all! – of the following attractions. Click on the image to be taken to the post.

Five Heroes of Vig - Skhoder

Five Heroes of Vig – Skhoder

 

Butrint

Butrint – a Greek and Roman story in Southern Albania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albanian Town Planning - drastic measures taken

Albanian Town Planning – drastic measures taken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mother Albania Expelling The Priest and The Monarchy

Mother Albania Expelling The Priest and The Monarch

No, Vladimir Ilyich and Uncle Joe, you shall not go to the ball

No, Vladimir Ilyich and Uncle Joe, you shall not go to the ball

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Martyrs' Cemetery - Tirana

National Martyrs’ Cemetery – Tirana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visiting Enver Hoxha' Grave in Tirana

Visiting Enver Hoxha’ Grave in Tirana

 

 

Anti-Communist paintings in the Franciscan church in Skhoder

Anti-Communist paintings in the Franciscan church in Skhoder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Komani Lake - The most impressive ferry trip in Europe?

Komani Lake – The most impressive ferry trip in Europe?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'The Albanians' Mosaic on the National Historical Museum, Tirana

‘The Albanians’ Mosaic on the National Historical Museum, Tirana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The dordolec, the 'evil eye' and superstition in Albania

The dordolec, the ‘evil eye’ and superstition in Albania

Saranda War Memorial, Albania

Saranda War Memorial, Albania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resurrection of Christ Greek Orthodox Cathedral - Tirana

Resurrection of Christ Greek Orthodox Cathedral – Tirana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Tirana

Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Tirana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impressions of Saranda, Southern Albania

Impressions of Saranda, Southern Albania

 

'King' Zog's remains return to Tirana

‘King’ Zog’s remains return to Tirana

 

 

 

 

 

 

German Fascist Memorial in Tirana, Albania

German Fascist Memorial in Tirana, Albania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reasons to be suspicious – Albanian-British Relationships in the 1940s

Reasons to be suspicious – Albanian-British Relationships in the 1940s

The English Cemetery in Tirana Park

The English Cemetery in Tirana Park

 

Rinas – Nënë (Mother) Tereza – Tirana International Airport

A hundred years of Albanian Independence?

Panagia Monastery Church – Mother of Christ – Dhermi, Albania

Walking from Valbona to Thethi in north-eastern Albania

Skënderbeu Chardonnay – more like a sherry than a wine

The first 4 Albanian wines – but not planned to be the last

Syri i Kalter, the Blue Eye, not winking so much at the moment

Five Fallen Stars Rise Again – Dema Monument

Korça dark beer – a welcome respite from bland lager