VI Lenin – Collected Works – Volumes 11 – 15

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VI Lenin – Collected Works – Volumes 11 – 15

On this, previous and subsequent pages, you will find the Collected Works of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin. The intention is, eventually, to provide full contents for each volume posted. As it stands at the moment that is only available for the first few volumes – contents for later volumes will appear gradually over a period of time.

However all of the 45 volumes of Lenin’s Collected Works will be available in pdf format to download from the start. There are two further volumes, an Index of Works and Names and another a Subject Index. Those volumes will be made available as soon as practicable.

These volumes were made available by the comrades at From Marx to Mao, to whom we give our thanks. They have other material on their website – some of which is available here but others (especially individual pamphlets of the great Marxist-Leninists) are not.

VI Lenin Collected Works: Volumes 1 – 5, Volumes 6 – 10; Volumes 16 – 45;

Already on this site you can find the Works of JV Stalin, Mao Tse-tung and Enver Hoxha.

 

Volume Eleven – June 1906 – January 1907

Preface 13

1906

On the eve 15

Wavering above, determination below 17

Unity! 20

The Duma and the people 24

The fight for power and the ‘fight’ for sops 27

The declaration of our group in the Duma 32

‘What thou doest, do quickly’ 38

Useful polemics 40

Famine relief and the tactics of the Duma 43

Negotiations about the cabinet 48

Among newspapers and periodicals 50

Who is for alliances with the Cadets? 53

The Cadet Duma grants money to the Pogrom-mongers’ Government 60

Yes-men of the Cadets 64

Once again about the Duma cabinet 69

Among newspapers and periodicals 74

The unsound arguments of the ‘non-party’ boycotters 77

The bourgeoisie’s censures and the proletariat’s call for action 83

The army and the people 85

Among newspapers and periodicals 88

Organisation of the masses and choice of the moment for struggle 90

Among newspaper and periodicals 94

A bold assault and a timid defence 96

The parties in the Duma and the people 101

Conspiracies of reaction’ and threats of the pogrom-mongers 105

The dissolution of the Duma and the tasks of the proletariat 100

  • I 111
  • II 116
  • III 118
  • IV 124
  • V 129
  • VI 130

Dispatch of a delegation to Sveaborg. Resolution of the Executive Commission of the St. Petersburg Committee of the R.S.D.L.P. 132

Before the storm 135

The boycott 141

The political crisis and the bankruptcy of opportunist tactics 150

  • I 150
  • II 151
  • III 154
  • IV 160
  • V 163

The events of the day 167

A ‘Labour Congress’ 170

Lessons of the Moscow uprising 171

Vacillating tactics 179

The government’s policy and the coming struggle 184

Hands off! 189

The guerrilla action of the Polish Socialist Party 194

Union of the Bund with the Russian Social-democratic Labour Party 195

Socialist-revolutionary Mensheviks 197

A new coup d’etat in preparation 207

Guerrilla warfare 213

  • I 213
  • II 215
  • III 216
  • IV 222

The question of guerrilla warfare 224

An attempt at a classification of the political parties of Russia 225

Notes on ‘Sotsial-Demokrat, No. 1 232

The Russian radical is wise after the event 236

The results of the Cadet Congress 241

Philistinism in revolutionary circles 246

Martov’s and Cherevanln’s pronouncements in the bourgeois press 257

  • Lies Spread by L. Martov Through the Columns of the Bourgeois Press 257
  • Martov and Cherevanin 260
  • Social-Democrats and Bourgeois Newspapers 262

On convening an Extraordinary Party Congress 264

How history is written 267

Postscript to the article ‘The Social-democrats and the election campaign’ 271

The Social-democrats and electoral agreements 275

  • I 277
  • II 279
  • III 281
  • IV 284
  • V 287
  • VI 290
  • VII 295

A dissenting opinion recorded at the All-Russian Conference of the Russian Social-democratic Labour Party by the Social-democratic delegates from Poland, the Lettish territory, St. Petersburg, Moscow, the central industrial region and the Volga area 299

Draft election address 302

Blocs with the cadets 307

Party discipline and the fight against the pro-cadet social-democrats 320

How the Armavir Social-democrats are conducting their election campaign 324

Whom to elect to the State Duma 326

  • What are the three chief parties? 326
  • Whose interests do the three chief parties defend? 326
  • What do the three chief parties strive for? 327
  • What kind of freedom do the three chief parties want to give the people? 327
  • How do the three chief parties regard the peasants’ demand for land? 328
  • What can the three chief parties achieve if their whole struggle is successful? 328

Social-democrats and the Trudovik Parties 329

  • Which parties claim to defend the interests of the working class and all working people? 329
  • Whose interests do these parties actually defend? 330
  • How steadfast are these parties in the great world-wide struggle of labour against capital 330
  • What can these parties achieve by completely fulfilling their ultimate aims? 330
  • What kind of freedom for the people are these parties trying to achieve in the present evolution? 331
  • What is the attitude of these parties to the peasants’ demand for land? 331

The new senate interpretation 332

The crisis of Menshevism 341

  • I 341
  • II 348
  • III 353
  • IV 359

The proletariat and its ally in the Russian Revolution 365

Concerning an article published in the organ of the Bund 376

The government’s falsification of the Duma and the tasks of the Social-democrats 383

The political situation and the tasks of the working class 389

The working-class party’s tasks and the peasantry 396

Preface to the Russian translation of W. Liebknecht’s pamphlet ‘No compromises, no electoral agreements’ 401

Preface to the Russian translation of K. Kautsky’s pamphlet ‘The driving forces and prospects of the Russian Revolution’ 408

The attitude of the bourgeois parties and of the workers’ party to the Duma elections 414

1907

Plekhanov and Vasilyev 419

The workers’ party election campaign in St. Petersburg 426

The Social-democrats and the Duma elections 431

  • The Social-democrats and the elections in St. Petersburg 433
  • The conditions under which the Social-democratic Conference was convened, and its composition 433
  • The question of dividing the Conference 441
  • What is the significance of the Menshevik walk-out at the Conference? 444
  • The political parties and the forthcoming elections in St. Petersburg 450
  • Postscript 453

When you hear the judgement of a fool – From the Notes of a Social-Democratic Publicist 456

Notes 475

The Life and Work of V. I. Lenin. Outstanding dates 511

VI Lenin - Collected Works - 11

VI Lenin – Collected Works – 11

 

Volume Twelve – January – June 1907

Preface 13

1907

The Social-democratic election campaign in St. Petersburg 15

Descending rung by rung 24

The protest of the thirty-one Mensheviks 29

The St. Petersburg elections and the hypocrisy of the thirty-one Mensheviks 33

How to vote in the St. Petersburg elections. ls there a danger of the Black Hundreds winning the St. Petersburg elections? 45

The St. Petersburg elections and the crisis of opportunism 57

The elections in the worker curia in St. Petersburg 62

The struggle between S.D.’s and S.R.’s in the elections in the worker curia in St. Petersburg 70

How to vote in the St. Petersburg elections. Who benefits from the fables about the Black-hundred danger? 75

The Moscow elections – preliminary results 81

A political lidvaliad 83

The results of the elections in the worker curia in St. Petersburg 86

On the report of the Moscow district of St. Petersburg concerning the elections to the second Duma 93

Some figures on the elections in the worker curia in South Russia 95

The significance of the St. Petersburg elections 98

Preface to the Russian translation of Karl Marx’s letters to Dr. Kugelmann 104

The second Duma and the second revolutionary wave 113

The election results in St Petersburg 119

Report to the Conference of the St. Petersburg organisation on the question of the Duma campaign and Duma tactics. Brief newspaper report 127

  • Concluding speech 131

Draft resolutions for the Fifth Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. 133

  • 1. The present stage in the democratic revolution 135
  • 2. The attitude to the bourgeois parties 136
  • 3. The class tasks of the proletariat at the present stage of the democratic revolution 138
  • 4. The tactics of the Social-democrats in the State Duma 140
  • 5. The intensification of mass destitution and of the economic struggle 142
  • 6. Non-party; workers’ organisations and the anarcho-syndicalist trend among the proletariat 142

Tactics of the R.S.D.L.P. in the election campaign. Interview granted to a special correspondent of ‘L’Humanite’ on February 17 (March 2), 1907 145

The opening of the second State Duma 152

The second Duma and the tasks of the proletariat 156

The first important step 161

Petty-bourgeois tactics 165

What the splitters have to say about the coming split 170

On the tactics of opportunism 173

The Bolsheviks and the petty bourgeoisie 179

The imminent dissolution of the Duma and questions of tactics 184

Cadets and Trudoviks 189

Apropos of Stolypin’s Declaration. Draft manifesto. 193

The elections to the Duma and the tactics of the Russian Social-democrats 196

The platform of Revolutionary Social-democracy 208

  • I 208
  • II 213

How not to write resolutions 219

Instead of an afterword 240

A note on the resolution of the Estonian Social-democrats 243

The terms of the deal 244

The Menshevik tactical platform 249

Draft for a speech on the agrarian question in the second State Duma 267

Fine words-foul deeds 300

The Duma and the approval of the budget 306

The cuckoo praises the rooster 312

Intellectualist warriors against domination by the intelligentsia 316

Angry embarrassment. The question of the Labour Congress 320

The agrarian question and the forces of the revolution 333

An anaemic Duma or an anaemic petty bourgeoisie 337

Banality triumphant, or S.R.’s ape the cadets 341

The Social-democratic group and April 3 in the Duma 345

The strength and weakness of the Russian revolution 349

  • I 349
  • II 353

Preface to the Russian translation of letters by Johannes Becker, Joseph Dietzgen, Frederick Engels, Karl Marx, and others to Friedrich Sorge and others 359

  • How the classics estimated intellectualist opportunism in Social-democracy 371

The Duma and the Russian liberals 379

Franz Mehrjng on the second Duma 383

  • German liberalism and the Russian Duma 384

Larin and Khrustalev 390

Reorganisation and the end of the split in St. Petersburg 395

On the question of a nation-wide revolution 404

Apropos of the minutes of the November military and combat conference of the Russian Social-democratic Labour Party 409

Report to the Fifth Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. on the St. Petersburg split and the institution of the party tribunal ensuing therefrom 419

  • I Speech for the defence (or for the prosecution of the Menshevik section of the Central Committee) delivered at the Party tribunal 421
  • II A brief summary of the real history of the St. Petersburg split 432

The Fifth Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. April 30-May 19 (May 13-June 1), 1907 437

  • 1. Speech during the discussion on the Congress agenda, May 2 (15) 439
  • 2. Speech on the report on the activities of the Central Committee, May 4 (17) 442
  • 3. Speech on the report on the activities of the Duma group, May 8 (21) 448
  • 4. Statement of fact, May 10 (23) 453
  • 5. Statement of May 11 (24) 455
  • 6. Speech on the attitude towards bourgeois parties, May 12 (25) 456
  • 7. Concluding remarks on the report on the attitude towards bourgeois parties, May 14 (27) 469
  • 8. Speech on the attitude to the Polish draft Resolution on bourgeois parties, May 15 (28) 475
  • 9. Objections to Trotsky’s amendments to the Bolshevik resolution on the attitude towards bourgeois parties, adopted by the Congress, May 15-16 (28-29) 479
  • 10. Objections to Martov’s amendments to the Bolshevik resolution on the attitude to bourgeois parties, May 16 (29) 480
  • 11. Objections to Martynov’s amendments to the resolution on the attitude towards bourgeois parties, May 16 (29) 482
  • 12. Report of the commission formed to draft a resolution on the State Duma, May 18 (31) 484
  • 13. Remarks during the discussion on the re-voting on those elected to the C.C., May 19 (June 1) 488
  • 14. Attitude towards bourgeois parties 489
  • I 490
  • II 500
  • III 506

Notes 511

The Life and Work of V. I. Lenin. Chronology 555

VI Lenin - Collected Works - 12

VI Lenin – Collected Works – 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volume Thirteen – June 1907 – April 1908

Preface 13

1907

Against Boycott. Notes of a Social-Democratic Publicist 15

  • I 18
  • II 24
  • III 27
  • IV 33
  • V 36
  • VI 44
  • VII 48

In memory of Count Heyden. What Are Our Non-Party ‘Democrats’ Teaching the People? 50

Theses of a report made at the St. Petersburg City Conference of July 8 on the attitude of the Social-democratic Labour Party to the Third Duma 58

The Third Conference of the R.S.D.L.P. (Second All-Russian) 60

  • 1. Draft Resolution on Participation in the Elections to the Third Duma 60
  • 2. Outline of a Draft Resolution on the All-Russian Congress of Trade Unions 61

Notes of a publicist 62

The International Socialist Congress in Stuttgart 75

The International Socialist Congress in Stuttgart 82

Preface to the collection ‘Twelve years’ 94

Revolution and Counter-revolution 114

The Third Duma 123

On Plekhanov’s article 133

Conference of the St. Petersburg Organisation of the R.S.D.L.P. From a Newspaper Report 135

  • 1. Report on the Third State Duma 135
  • 2. Resolution on the Third State Duma 138
  • 3. Report on the Participation of Social-Democrats in the Bourgeois Press 140

The Fourth Conference of the R.S.D.L.P. (Third All-Russian) From a Newspaper Report 141

  • I. Report on the Tactics of the Social-Democratic Group in the Third State Duma 141
  • 2. Resolution on the Tactics of the Social-Democratic Group in the Third State Duma 144.

The preparation of a ‘Disgusting orgy’ 147

But who are the judges? 153

Preface to the pamphlet by Voinov (A. V. Lunacharsky) on the attitude of the Party towards the Trade Unions. 161

The Agrarian Question and the ‘Critics of Marx’ 169

  • X. The ‘Work’ of the German Bulgakov, E. David 171
  • XI. Livestock in Small and Large Farms 182
  • XII. The ‘Ideal Country’ from the Standpoint of the Opponents of Marxism on the Agrarian Question 194

the Agrarian Programme of Social-democracy in the First Russian Revoution, 1905-1907 217

Chapter I The Economic Basis and Nature of the Agrarian. Revolution in Russia 220

  • 1. Landownership in European Russia 220
  • 2. What is the struggle about? 225
  • 3. The Cadet writers obscure the nature of the struggle 231
  • 4. The economic nature of the Agrarian Revolution and its ideological cloaks 234
  • 5. Two types of bourgeois agrarian evolution 238
  • 6. Two lines of Agrarian Programmes in the Revolution 243
  • 7. Russia’s land area. The question of the colonisation 247
  • 8. Summary of the economic deductions of Chapter I 254

Chapter II. The Agrarian Programmes of the R.S.D.L.P. and their test in the First Revolution 255

  • 1. What was the mistake in the previous Agrarian Programmes of Russian Social-Democracy? 255
  • 2. The present Agrarian Programme of the R.S.D.L.P. 258
  • 3. The chief argument of the Municipalisers tested by Events 261
  • 4. The Agrarian Programme of the peasantry 267
  • 5. Medieval landownership and the Bourgeois Revolution 272
  • 6. Why had the small proprietors in Russia to declare in favour of nationalisation? 276
  • 7. The Peasants and the Narodniks on the Nationalisation of Allotment Land 284
  • 8. The Mistake Made by M. Shanin and Other Advocates of Division 287

Chapter III. The Theoretical Basis of Nationalisation and of Municipalisation 294

  • 1. What Is nationalisation of the land? 295
  • 2. Pyotr Maslov corrects Karl Marx’s Rough Notes 300
  • 3. Is it necessary to refute Marx in order to refute the Narodniks? 307
  • 4. Is the repudiation of absolute rent connected with the programme of Municipalisation? 311
  • 5. Criticism of private landownership from the standpoint of the development of capitalism 313
  • 6. The Nationalisation of the land and ‘Money’ Rent 316
  • 7. Under what conditions can Nationalisation be brought about? 318
  • 8. Does Nationalisation mean transition to division? 323

Chapter IV. Political and Tactical Considerations in Questions of the Agrarian Programme 325

  • 1. ‘A Guarantee Against Restoration’ 325
  • 2. Local self-government as a ‘Bulwark against reaction’ 332
  • 3. The central authority and the consolidation of the Bourgeois State 337
  • 4. The scope of the political and of the Agrarian Revolutions 344
  • 5. A Peasant Revolution without the conquest of power by the peasantry? 351
  • 6. Is Land Nationalisation a sufficiently flexible method? 355
  • 7. Municipalisation of the Land and Municipal Socialism 358
  • 8. Some examples of the muddle caused by Municipalisation 363

Chapter V. Classes and Parties in the Debate on the Agrarian Question in the Second Duma 366

  • I. The rights and the Octobrists 368
  • 2. The Cadets 374
  • 3. The Right Peasants 380
  • 4. The Non-Party Peasants 383
  • 5. The Narodnik Intellectuals 388
  • 6. The Trudovik Peasants (Narodniks) 394
  • 7. The Socialist-Revolutionaries 400
  • 8. The ‘Nationals’ 405
  • 9. The Social-Democrats 414

Conclusion 421

Postscript 430

1908

The debate on the extension of the Duma’s budgetary powers 432

Postscript to the article ‘The debate on the extension of the Duma’s budgetary powers’ 439

Political notes 440

Statement of the editors of Proletary 447

A letter to A. M. Gorky 448

The New Agrarian Policy 455

Trade-union neutrality 460

The happening to the King of Portugal 470

Lessons of the Commune 475

A police-patriotic demonstration made to order 479

Deception of the people by the liberals 485

An estimate of Marx by International Liberalism 490

Notes 495

The Life and Work of V. I. Lenin. Outstanding Dates 535

VI Lenin - Collected Works - 13

VI Lenin – Collected Works – 13

 

 

Volume Fourteen – 1908

Materialism and Empirio-Criticsm – Critical comments on a Reactionary Philosophy

Preface 11

1908

Ten questions to a lecturer 13

MATERIALISM AND EMPIRIO-CRITICISM. Critical comments on a Reactionary Philosophy 17

Preface to the First Edition 19

Preface to the Second Edition 21

In Lieu of an Introduction. How certain ‘Marxists’ in 1908 and certain idealists in 1710 refuted materialism 22

Chapter One. The Theory of Knowledge of Empirio-criticism and of Dialectical Materialism I 40

  • 1. Sensations and complexes of sensations 40
  • 2. ‘The discovery of the world-elements’ 53
  • 3. The principal co-ordination and ‘Naive Realism’ 67
  • 4. Did Nature exist prior to Man? 75
  • 5. Does Man think with the help of the brain? 86
  • 6. The solipsism of Mach and Avenarius 94

Chapter Two. The Theory of Knowledge of Empirio-criticism and of Dialectical Materialism II 98

  • 1. The ‘Thing-in-Itself’ or V. Chernov refutes Frederick Engels 98
  • 2. ‘Transcendence’ or V. Bazarov ‘revises’ Engels 107
  • 3. L. Fauerbach and J. Dietzgen on the ‘Thing-in-Itself ‘ 117
  • 4. Does objective truth exist? 122
  • 5. Absolute and Relative Truth, or the eclecticism of Engels as discovered by A. Bogdanov 131
  • 6. The criterion of practice in the Theory of Knowledge 138

Chapter Three. The Theory of Knowledge of Dialectical Materialism and of Empirio-criticism. III 144

  • 1. What is Matter? What is Experience? 144
  • 2. Plekhanov’s error concerning the concept ‘Experience’ 151
  • 3. Causality and necessity in Nature 153
  • 4. The ‘Principle of economy of thought’ and the problem of the ‘Unity of the World’ 169
  • 5. Space and time 175
  • 6. Freedom and necessity 187

Chapter Four. The philosophical idealists as comrades-in-arms and successors of Empirio-criticism 194

  • 1. The criticism of Kantianism from the Left and from the Right 194
  • 2. How the ‘Empirio-Symbolist’ Yushkevich ridiculed the ‘Empirio-criticist’ Chernov 205
  • 3. The Immanentists as comrades-in-arms of Mach and Avenarius 209
  • 4. In what direction is Empirio-criticism developing? 217
  • 5. A. Bogdanov’s ‘Empirio-monism’ 226
  • 6. The ‘Theory of Symbols’ (or Hieroglyphs) and the criticism of Helmholtz 232
  • 7. Two kinds of criticism of Duhring 238
  • 8. How could J. Dietzgen have found favour with the reactionary philosophers? 243

Chapter Five. The recent revolution in natural science and philosophical idealism 250

  • 1. The crisis in modern physics 252
  • 2. ‘Matter has disappeared’ 258
  • 3. Is motion without matter conceivable? 266
  • 4. The two trends in modern physics and English Spiritualism 274
  • 5. The two trends in modern physics and German Idealism 282
  • 6. The two trends in modern physics and French Fideism 290
  • 7. A Russian ‘Idealist Physicist’ 299
  • 8. The essence and significance of ‘Physical’ Idealism 302

Chapter Six. Empirio-criticism and Historical Materialism 314

  • 1. The excursions of the German Empirio-criticists into the field of the social sciences 314
  • 2. How Bogdanov corrects and ‘develops’ Marx 322
  • 3. Suvorov’s ‘Foundations of Social Philosophy’ 330
  • 4. Parties in philosophy and philosophical blockheads 335
  • 5. Ernst Haeckel and Ernst Mach 346

Conclusion 357

Supplement to Chapter Four, Section 1. From what angle did N. G. Chernyshevsky criticise Kantianism? 359

Notes 363

The Life and Work of V. I. Lenin (Chronology) 389

Name Index 399

VI Lenin - Collected Works - 14

VI Lenin – Collected Works – 14

 

Volume Fifteen – March 1908 – August 1909

Preface 13

1908

On to the straight road 19

On the ‘Nature’ of the Russian Revolution 22

Marxism and Revisionism 29

On the beaten track! 40

A bloc of the Cadets and the Octobrists? 48

The assessment of the Russian Revolution 50

Cadets of the second generation 63

The Agrarian Question in Russia towards the close of the nineteenth century 69

  • I 75
  • II 83
  • III 92
  • IV 106
  • V 118
  • VI 127
  • VII 135

Some features of the present collapse 148

The Agrarian Programme of Social-democracy in the Russian Revolution. Auto-abstract 158

Inflammable material in world politics 182

From the Editorial Board 189

Bellicose militarism and the anti militarist tactics of Social-democracy 191

  • I 191
  • II 193
  • III 196

Leo Tolstoy as the mirror of the Russian Revolution 202

British and German workers demonstrate for peace 210

The student movement and the present political situation 213

Events in the Balkans and in Persia 220

Meeting of the International Socialist Bureau 231

P. Maslov in hysterics 247

Some remarks on the ‘Reply’ by P. Maslov 255

The assessment of the present situation 267

How Plekhanov and co. defend Revisionism 281

Two letters 286

The agrarian debates in the Third Duma 303

The Fifth (All-Russian) Conference of the R.S.D,L,P, December 21-27, 1908 (January 3-9, 1909) 319

  • 1. Draft resolution on the present moment and the tasks of the Party 321
  • 2. Directives for the committee on questions of organisation 325
  • 3. Practical instructions on voting for the budget by the Social-democratic Group in the Duma 326
  • First Variant 326
  • Second Variant 326
  • 4. Addendum to the Resolution on ‘The Social-democratic Group in the Duma’. 328

5. Statement by the Bolsheviks, Statement of Facts 329

1909

How the Socialist-revolutionaries sum up the Revolution and how the Revolution has summed them up 330

On the road 345

On the article ‘Questions of the day’ 356

The aim of the proletarian struggle in our revolution 360

  • I. 360
  • II. 367
  • Ill. 370
  • IV. 375
  • V. 378

To the Executive Committee of the German Social-democratic Labour Party 380

A caricature of Bolshevism 383

The ‘Leftward swing’ of the bourgeoisie and the tasks of the proletariat 395

The attitude of the Workers’ Party to religion 402

Classes and parties in their attitude to religion and the church 414

Conference of the extended editorial board of ‘Proletary’, June 8-17 (21-30), 1909 425

Report on the conference of the extended editorial board of ‘Proletary’ 427

Speech on the question of the tasks of the Bolsheviks in the Party, June 11 (24) 436

Speech and draft resolution on the tasks of the Bolsheviks in relation to Duma activity 438

Resolutions of the conference of the extended editorial board of ‘Proletary’ 442

  • 1. On Otzovism and Ultimatumism 442
  • 2. The Tasks of the Bolsheviks in the Party 448
  • 3. Agitation for a Bolshevik Congress or Bolshevik Conference separate from the Party 449
  • 4. The Party School Being Set Up Abroad at X – 450
  • 5. The breakaway of Comrade Maximov 451

The liquidation of Liquidationism 452

The Tsar visits Europe and members of the Black-hundred Duma visit England 461

M. Lyadov’s letter to ‘Proletary’ 467

A letter to the organisers of the Party School on Capri 468

A letter to Comrades Julius, Vanya, Savely, Ivan, Vladimir, Stanislav and Foma, students at the Capri Party School 472

Notes 479

The Life and Work of V. I. Lenin. Outstanding Dates 514

VI Lenin - Collected Works - 15

VI Lenin – Collected Works – 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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